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CHATEAU TROTTEVIEILLE 1er grand cru classe (B), St-Emilion 2015

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99 points - JS 99 JS 97 points - AC 97 AC 96 points - NM 96 NM CHATEAU TROTTEVIEILLE 1er grand cru classe (B), St-Emilion 2015 CHATEAU TROTTEVIEILLE 1er grand cru classe (B), St-Emilion 2015

CHATEAU TROTTEVIEILLE 1er grand cru classe (B), St-Emilion 2015

<p>Château Trotte Vielle 1er grand cru classe (B), St-Emilion</p> <p>The name literally translates to <em>‘trotting old lady’</em> and origin of this name somewhat contested. Some say it is a reference to an 18th-century lady who ‘trotted’ about the village in search of gossip while the winery says they can produce written evidence of the name some few hundred years before that. We can concern ourselves less with the origins of the name and more on what to expect from the wine. </p> <p>The Left Bank winery has been owned by the négociant house Borie-Manoux (who also own Château Batailley in Pauillac and Château Beau Site in St-Estèphe) since 1949. Located east of St-Émilion, the walled vineyard is planted to (almost) half and half 95% Merlot and Cabernet Franc, with the former slight edging in the number of vines. The balance of the vineyard is planted to Cabernet Sauvignon. Form the 10-hectare walled vineyard, the grapes are harvested by hand, fermented in concrete vats before the wine is wine is matured in majority new oak, French of course. </p>
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Château Trotte Vielle 1er grand cru classe (B), St-Emilion

The name literally translates to ‘trotting old lady’ and origin of this name somewhat contested. Some say it is a reference to an 18th-century lady who ‘trotted’ about the village in search of gossip while the winery says they can produce written evidence of the name some few hundred years before that. We can concern ourselves less with the origins of the name and more on what to expect from the wine.

The Left Bank winery has been owned by the négociant house Borie-Manoux (who also own Château Batailley in Pauillac and Château Beau Site in St-Estèphe) since 1949. Located east of St-Émilion, the walled vineyard is planted to (almost) half and half 95% Merlot and Cabernet Franc, with the former slight edging in the number of vines. The balance of the vineyard is planted to Cabernet Sauvignon. Form the 10-hectare walled vineyard, the grapes are harvested by hand, fermented in concrete vats before the wine is wine is matured in majority new oak, French of course.

  • Style: Merlot-Cabernet Franc
  • Vintage: 2015
  • Region: St-Emilion
  • Code: TROTT
  • Varietal: Cabernet Franc,Merlot
  • Country: France

Region St-Emilion

St.-Émilion is the star of Bordeaux’s Right Bank, north of the Dordogne River. The rich red wines produced in St.-Émilion, based on Merlot and Cabernet Franc, are less tannic and generally more fruit-driven in flavour than the Cabernet-based wines of Left Bank. Merlot thrives on the plateaus high above the Dordogne, where the soil is filled with sand and clay, a perfect medium for creating opulent, fruit-forward wines. With a typically savoury character, St.-Émilion wines are sometimes called the “Burgundies of Bordeaux.” These refined reds, with loads of finesse, are elegant companions to beef, chicken, pork and duck. The wines of St.-Émilion were not included in the famous 1855 classification of Bordeaux, which ranked wines of the Left Bank. In 1955, St.-Émilion published its own classification, based on soil analysis, wine quality and reputation of the properties. Unlike the 1855 classification, St.-Emilion’s system requires

St.-Émilion is the star of Bordeaux’s Right Bank, north of the Dordogne River. The rich red wines produced in St.-Émilion, based on Merlot and Cabernet Franc, are less tannic and generally more fruit-driven in flavour than the Cabernet-based wines of Left Bank. Merlot thrives on the plateaus high above the Dordogne, where the soil is filled with sand and clay, a perfect medium for creating opulent, fruit-forward wines. With a typically savoury character, St.-Émilion wines are sometimes called the “Burgundies of Bordeaux.” These refined reds, with loads of finesse, are elegant companions to beef, chicken, pork and duck.

The wines of St.-Émilion were not included in the famous 1855 classification of Bordeaux, which ranked wines of the Left Bank. In 1955, St.-Émilion published its own classification, based on soil analysis, wine quality and reputation of the properties. Unlike the 1855 classification, St.-Emilion’s system requires properties to continuously prove themselves. The list is revised regularly, most recently in 2012. There are two tiers within the classification, Premier Grand Cru Classé and Grand Cru Classé. There are currently just 18 Premier Grand Cru properties and 64 Grand Cru Classé properties.

The St.-Émilion appellation is home to hundreds of individual producers, enhancing the variety of wines made there. Many of the properties remain small, family-run enterprises, unlike the large châteaux of the Left Bank. The area is also the base of France’s controversial micro-châteaux or garagiste wine movement; these innovative winemakers operate outside the traditional classification system, making very high quality (and very expensive) highly extracted wines.

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ABN: 13 133 179 656
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ABN: 13 133 179 656 New South Wales: Liquor Act 2007. It is against the law to sell or supply alcohol to, or to obtain alcohol on behalf of, a person under the age of 18 years. License Number: LIQP770010303 Victoria: Victoria Liquor Control Reform Act 1998: It is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years (Penalty exceeds $17,000), for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor (Penalty exceeds $700). License Number: 32055289