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LANGMEIL WINERY Orphan Bank Shiraz, Barossa Valley 2014

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points + "-" + Model.Badges[i].Name 96 HH LANGMEIL WINERY Orphan Bank Shiraz, Barossa Valley 2014 LANGMEIL WINERY Orphan Bank Shiraz, Barossa Valley 2014

LANGMEIL WINERY Orphan Bank Shiraz, Barossa Valley 2014

The first vintages of this wine (from 2004) came from a 160-year-old ‘ancestor vine’ vineyard in Tanunda, about a kilometre from the Langmeil winery. The vineyard had been sold to make way for housing – and Langmeil’s Paul Lindner made a remarkable decision to save the vines from the developer’s bulldozer. In the winter of 2006 Lindner and his team moved more than 300 vines – one by one – replanting them at Langmeil on the north bank – renamed the Orphan Bank – of the Para River. The vines have thrived in their new home and the Orphan Bank Shiraz is now an international flagbearer for old vine Barossa Valley Shiraz, alongside Langmeil’s The 1843 Freedom Shiraz, from vines planted in 1843 on what is probably the world’s oldest surviving Shiraz vineyard. The Orphan Bank Shiraz highlights the rare qualities of old vine Shiraz using hands-on winemaking techniques. Gentle destemming, open fermentation, basket pressing and two years in French hogsheads (50% new) accentuate the wine’s natural fruit intensity and structure. From the 2013 vintage Orphan Bank Shiraz includes about one-third old vine Eden Valley Shiraz.
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The first vintages of this wine (from 2004) came from a 160-year-old ‘ancestor vine’ vineyard in Tanunda, about a kilometre from the Langmeil winery. The vineyard had been sold to make way for housing – and Langmeil’s Paul Lindner made a remarkable decision to save the vines from the developer’s bulldozer. In the winter of 2006 Lindner and his team moved more than 300 vines – one by one – replanting them at Langmeil on the north bank – renamed the Orphan Bank – of the Para River. The vines have thrived in their new home and the Orphan Bank Shiraz is now an international flagbearer for old vine Barossa Valley Shiraz, alongside Langmeil’s The 1843 Freedom Shiraz, from vines planted in 1843 on what is probably the world’s oldest surviving Shiraz vineyard. The Orphan Bank Shiraz highlights the rare qualities of old vine Shiraz using hands-on winemaking techniques. Gentle destemming, open fermentation, basket pressing and two years in French hogsheads (50% new) accentuate the wine’s natural fruit intensity and structure. From the 2013 vintage Orphan Bank Shiraz includes about one-third old vine Eden Valley Shiraz.
  • Style: Shiraz/Syrah
  • Vintage: 2014
  • Region: Barossa Valley
  • Code: LOBS
  • Varietal: Shiraz
  • Country: Australia

Region Barossa Valley

Colonel William Light, the South Australian colony’s Surveyor-General, named the Barossa in 1837 after the site of an English victory over the French in the Spanish Peninsular War. In the mid-1800’s Silesian and English immigrants settled in the area. The Barossa itself comprises two distinct sub-regions: Eden Valley and the warmer Barossa Valley floor at 270m.The Barossa Valley enjoys a warm Mediterranean climate characterised by hot dry summers and relatively low rainfall. Cool sea breezes from the Gulf of St Vincent modify the temperature, however hot northerly winds can occasionally dominate creating considerable vine stress. Many older established vineyards are dry-grown, but supplementary irrigation is also extensively used. The valley is comprised of rich brown soils and alluvial sands. A long history of uninterrupted viticulture in the area means the Barossa valley is home to Australia’s largest concentration of old-vine Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre with man

Colonel William Light, the South Australian colony’s Surveyor-General, named the Barossa in 1837 after the site of an English victory over the French in the Spanish Peninsular War. In the mid-1800’s Silesian and English immigrants settled in the area. The Barossa itself comprises two distinct sub-regions: Eden Valley and the warmer Barossa Valley floor at 270m.The Barossa Valley enjoys a warm Mediterranean climate characterised by hot dry summers and relatively low rainfall. Cool sea breezes from the Gulf of St Vincent modify the temperature, however hot northerly winds can occasionally dominate creating considerable vine stress. Many older established vineyards are dry-grown, but supplementary irrigation is also extensively used. The valley is comprised of rich brown soils and alluvial sands. A long history of uninterrupted viticulture in the area means the Barossa valley is home to Australia’s largest concentration of old-vine Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre with many over 100 years old. Although most famous for Shiraz, the Barossa can also produce fragrant and deliciously fruity Grenache blends and beautifully rich, chocolatey Cabernet Sauvignons.

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Winery LANGMEIL WINERY

Langton’s Selections Langmeil The Freedom Shiraz, Langmeil Orphan Bank Shiraz, Langmeil The Fifth Wave Grenache In the early 1840s Christian Auricht, a blacksmith and newly arrived from Prussia, acquired some land at the new village of Langmeil in the Barossa. He planted a mixed orchard and Shiraz vineyard. He built a butcher’s shop, a bakery, a blacksmithy and the first village well. During the early days it was a coaching point where travellers stopped on their way to Kapunda and Burra. The Auricht family sold the buildings and land in the 1930s. A winery called Paradale was established on the site, but was again sold in the 1970s and renamed Bernkastel wines. In 1988 Langmeil was established by Richard Lindner, Chris Bitter and Carl Lindner – all Barossa-born and bred. A small patch, roughly 3½ acres of original Shiraz vines planted in the early 1840s remained intact. These vines are the source for Langmeil’s flagship wine The Freedom Shiraz, so named to recollect the ear
Langton’s Selections Langmeil The Freedom Shiraz, Langmeil Orphan Bank Shiraz, Langmeil The Fifth Wave Grenache In the early 1840s Christian Auricht, a blacksmith and newly arrived from Prussia, acquired some land at the new village of Langmeil in the Barossa. He planted a mixed orchard and Shiraz vineyard. He built a butcher’s shop, a bakery, a blacksmithy and the first village well. During the early days it was a coaching point where travellers stopped on their way to Kapunda and Burra. The Auricht family sold the buildings and land in the 1930s. A winery called Paradale was established on the site, but was again sold in the 1970s and renamed Bernkastel wines. In 1988 Langmeil was established by Richard Lindner, Chris Bitter and Carl Lindner – all Barossa-born and bred. A small patch, roughly 3½ acres of original Shiraz vines planted in the early 1840s remained intact. These vines are the source for Langmeil’s flagship wine The Freedom Shiraz, so named to recollect the early Lutheran pioneers of Langmeil who escaped religious persecution and political turmoil in Prussia. It is a traditional but concentrated Barossa style with lashings of sweet fruit, ripe tannins and oak. The wine is open fermented and then matured for up to 24 months in a combination of new and old French oak. The Orphan Bank Shiraz which sees a combination of new and used/seasoned American and French oak (proportions vary according to vintage) is a bloody good stock-in-trade style with plenty of fruit generosity and flavour length. The Fifth Wave Grenache, based on dry grown 60 year old vines is a powerful maturation style. The Three Gardens Shiraz Grenache Mourvedre is a classic juicy wine. Langmeil produces a number of other wines including a limited release Jackaman’s Cabernet Sauvignon based on southern Barossa fruit. Winemaker Paul Lindner belongs to a new generation of winemakers who believe that the fruit should be allowed to resonate with its origins. Oak is therefore always matched according to the overall volume and character of fruit. Langmeil has a moderate presence on the secondary wine market. The wines, however, are really good. Andrew Caillard MW, Langton's
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