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GRANT BURGE Meshach 2002

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outstanding Meshach Meshach

GRANT BURGE Meshach 2002

Meshach Shiraz is the flagship of the Grant Burge winery. It derives mostly from the Filsell Vineyard near Lyndoch, planted in 1920, with additional contributions from three other small sites, all with vines 100+ years old. The wine is matured in mostly new American and French oak hogsheads for around 22 months, and then in bottle for three years before release as a four to five year old. Meshach is a generous Barossa style with a ripe, dense palate packed with fruit, chocolaty tannins and supported by malty/roasted-chestnut new oak. Meshach develops attractive choc-berry/panforte characters with age. Named after Burge’s great-grandfather, Meshach neatly reflects both traditional winemaking philosophies and contemporary practices. The wine is prized for its consistency and cellaring potential.
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about this product

Meshach Shiraz is the flagship of the Grant Burge winery. It derives mostly from the Filsell Vineyard near Lyndoch, planted in 1920, with additional contributions from three other small sites, all with vines 100+ years old. The wine is matured in mostly new American and French oak hogsheads for around 22 months, and then in bottle for three years before release as a four to five year old. Meshach is a generous Barossa style with a ripe, dense palate packed with fruit, chocolaty tannins and supported by malty/roasted-chestnut new oak. Meshach develops attractive choc-berry/panforte characters with age. Named after Burge’s great-grandfather, Meshach neatly reflects both traditional winemaking philosophies and contemporary practices. The wine is prized for its consistency and cellaring potential.
  • Style: Red
  • Vintage: 2002
  • Region: Barossa
  • Code: GBMS
  • Varietal: Shiraz
  • Country: Australia

Region Barossa

Barossa Valley Colonel William Light, the South Australian colony’s Surveyor-General, named the Barossa in 1837 after the site of an English victory over the French in the Spanish Peninsular War. In the mid-1800’s Silesian and English immigrants settled in the area. The Barossa itself comprises two distinct sub-regions: Eden Valley and the warmer Barossa Valley floor at 270m.The Barossa Valley enjoys a warm Mediterranean climate characterised by hot dry summers and relatively low rainfall. Cool sea breezes from the Gulf of St Vincent modify the temperature, however hot northerly winds can occasionally dominate creating considerable vine stress. Many older established vineyards are dry-grown, but supplementary irrigation is also extensively used. The valley is comprised of rich brown soils and alluvial sands. A long history of uninterrupted viticulture in the area means the Barossa valley is home to Australia’s largest concentration of old-vine Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre with many

Barossa Valley

Colonel William Light, the South Australian colony’s Surveyor-General, named the Barossa in 1837 after the site of an English victory over the French in the Spanish Peninsular War. In the mid-1800’s Silesian and English immigrants settled in the area. The Barossa itself comprises two distinct sub-regions: Eden Valley and the warmer Barossa Valley floor at 270m.The Barossa Valley enjoys a warm Mediterranean climate characterised by hot dry summers and relatively low rainfall. Cool sea breezes from the Gulf of St Vincent modify the temperature, however hot northerly winds can occasionally dominate creating considerable vine stress. Many older established vineyards are dry-grown, but supplementary irrigation is also extensively used. The valley is comprised of rich brown soils and alluvial sands. A long history of uninterrupted viticulture in the area means the Barossa valley is home to Australia’s largest concentration of old-vine Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre with many over 100 years old. Although most famous for Shiraz, the Barossa can also produce fragrant and deliciously fruity Grenache blends and beautifully rich, chocolatey Cabernet Sauvignons.
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Winery GRANT BURGE

Langton’s Selections ^2Grant Burge Meshach Shiraz, Grant Burge Shadrach Cabernet Sauvignon, Grant Burge Filsell Shiraz, Grant Burge Holy Trinity Grenache-Shiraz-Mourvedre Grant Burge is one of the largest landowners in the Barossa and has built up a collection of impressive and historic vineyards mostly located in the southern and central parts of the Barossa floor and the Eden Valley. A fifth generation Barossa winemaker, he named Meshach Shiraz after his great-grandfather, who arrived in South Australia at age 11 in 1855. He lived to the ripe old age of 98, establishing the Wilsford Winery at Lyndoch. With superb viticultural resources, dovetailed with a family history and a bit of show business, Grant Burge has become a highly successful commercial wine producer making wines at several price points. He has established a remarkable reputation for quality and consistency for all his wines. His show medal tally is almost an embarrassment of riches. The secondary wine market
Langton’s Selections ^2Grant Burge Meshach Shiraz, Grant Burge Shadrach Cabernet Sauvignon, Grant Burge Filsell Shiraz, Grant Burge Holy Trinity Grenache-Shiraz-Mourvedre Grant Burge is one of the largest landowners in the Barossa and has built up a collection of impressive and historic vineyards mostly located in the southern and central parts of the Barossa floor and the Eden Valley. A fifth generation Barossa winemaker, he named Meshach Shiraz after his great-grandfather, who arrived in South Australia at age 11 in 1855. He lived to the ripe old age of 98, establishing the Wilsford Winery at Lyndoch. With superb viticultural resources, dovetailed with a family history and a bit of show business, Grant Burge has become a highly successful commercial wine producer making wines at several price points. He has established a remarkable reputation for quality and consistency for all his wines. His show medal tally is almost an embarrassment of riches. The secondary wine market however pays little attention to such accolades preferring the reality of track record and the sensibilities of the collector. It is Grant Burge’s Meshach Shiraz that has played no small part in the ascendancy of the Barossa Shiraz vernacular. This wine brings utterly sublime vineyard resources, marketing imagination and accessibility to the fine wine consumer. While it is pricey, it’s also fair. It generally offers a much better bang to your buck than many over-hyped cult type Shirazes. The fruit is sourced from the 80 year old Filsell vineyard planted on deep alluvial soils near Lyndoch. The vineyard is triaged on optimum ripeness and flavour development. This is often around 14 degrees Baume. The wine is vinified in open headed down fermenters at warm temperatures. Towards dryness, the wine is drained and pressed, completing fermentation in mostly new American oak hogsheads. Meshach is a highly concentrated and generous Barossa style with a ripe, dense palate packed with fruit, pronounced tannins and supported by American oak. Meshach is already highly regarded for its potential longevity and structure. Meshach has evolved as something of a secondary wine market staple. If Grange is a market indicator Meshach is something of a market backstop in the same way as Penfolds Bin 707 or Henschke Mount Edelstone. Grant Burge’s other ‘icon’ wines include the plush but erratic secondary market performing Shadrach Cabernet Sauvignon and the rather classical, indeed brilliant Abednego Shiraz Grenache Mourvedre. The latter has almost no presence on the market which must say something for its immediate approachability. Grant Burge Filsell Shiraz, Holy Trinity Grenache Shiraz Mourvedre and Hillcot Merlot are also regularly traded. Grant Burge is an important Barossa producer. While its product range is extensive, the commitment and resources are there for a bright future. Andrew Caillard MW, Langton's
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