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HARES CHASE Ironscraper 2013

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Ironscraper Ironscraper

HARES CHASE Ironscraper 2013

Ironscraper Shiraz is made from grapes grown on the Hare’s Chase vineyard at Marananga, the important Barossa subregion on the western edge of the valley floor. Hare’s Chase is the side-project of former Penfolds senior red winemaker Peter Taylor and Adelaide businessman Mike de la Haye and their families. When they purchased the 16ha property in 1997 it was a ‘fruit-salad’ of inappropriate varieties. Extensive replanting with now mature vines is what has made it possible, from 2013, for Taylor to make Ironscraper Shiraz. It is an elegant rather than overtly fruity style but remains an authentic, deeply-coloured Barossa Shiraz with concentration, richness and length of flavour. It is made distinctive by a small injection of Cabernet Sauvignon that elongates the palate, chiselling it perfectly into shape – just the sort of thing you’d expect from a Penfolds-trained winemaker. The name references the tough life of the hares living on the block, who must excavate their shallow scrapes, or forms, in the hard, iron-rich soil.
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about this product

Ironscraper Shiraz is made from grapes grown on the Hare’s Chase vineyard at Marananga, the important Barossa subregion on the western edge of the valley floor. Hare’s Chase is the side-project of former Penfolds senior red winemaker Peter Taylor and Adelaide businessman Mike de la Haye and their families. When they purchased the 16ha property in 1997 it was a ‘fruit-salad’ of inappropriate varieties. Extensive replanting with now mature vines is what has made it possible, from 2013, for Taylor to make Ironscraper Shiraz. It is an elegant rather than overtly fruity style but remains an authentic, deeply-coloured Barossa Shiraz with concentration, richness and length of flavour. It is made distinctive by a small injection of Cabernet Sauvignon that elongates the palate, chiselling it perfectly into shape – just the sort of thing you’d expect from a Penfolds-trained winemaker. The name references the tough life of the hares living on the block, who must excavate their shallow scrapes, or forms, in the hard, iron-rich soil.
  • Style: Red
  • Vintage: 2013
  • Region: Barossa Valley
  • Code: HCISSBV
  • Varietal: Shiraz
  • Country: Australia

Region Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley Colonel William Light, the South Australian colony’s Surveyor-General, named the Barossa in 1837 after the site of an English victory over the French in the Spanish Peninsular War. In the mid-1800’s Silesian and English immigrants settled in the area. The Barossa itself comprises two distinct sub-regions: Eden Valley and the warmer Barossa Valley floor at 270m.The Barossa Valley enjoys a warm Mediterranean climate characterised by hot dry summers and relatively low rainfall. Cool sea breezes from the Gulf of St Vincent modify the temperature, however hot northerly winds can occasionally dominate creating considerable vine stress. Many older established vineyards are dry-grown, but supplementary irrigation is also extensively used. The valley is comprised of rich brown soils and alluvial sands. A long history of uninterrupted viticulture in the area means the Barossa valley is home to Australia’s largest concentration of old-vine Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre with many

Barossa Valley

Colonel William Light, the South Australian colony’s Surveyor-General, named the Barossa in 1837 after the site of an English victory over the French in the Spanish Peninsular War. In the mid-1800’s Silesian and English immigrants settled in the area. The Barossa itself comprises two distinct sub-regions: Eden Valley and the warmer Barossa Valley floor at 270m.The Barossa Valley enjoys a warm Mediterranean climate characterised by hot dry summers and relatively low rainfall. Cool sea breezes from the Gulf of St Vincent modify the temperature, however hot northerly winds can occasionally dominate creating considerable vine stress. Many older established vineyards are dry-grown, but supplementary irrigation is also extensively used. The valley is comprised of rich brown soils and alluvial sands. A long history of uninterrupted viticulture in the area means the Barossa valley is home to Australia’s largest concentration of old-vine Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre with many over 100 years old. Although most famous for Shiraz, the Barossa can also produce fragrant and deliciously fruity Grenache blends and beautifully rich, chocolatey Cabernet Sauvignons.
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